Zinn hero essay

I was at a symposium in New Jersey where I pointed to the terrible crimes against the indigenous people of Hispaniola committed by Columbus and his fellow Spaniards.

We all know individuals-most of them unsung, unrecognized-who have, often in the most modest ways, spoken out or acted on their beliefs for a more egalitarian, more just, peace-loving society.

Carroll contrasted the heroism of McCain, the warrior, to that of Philip Berrigan, who has gone to prison dozens of times for protesting the war in Vietnam and the dangerous nuclear arsenal maintained by our government.

Or the Seminole leader Osceola, imprisoned and finally killed for leading a guerrilla campaign against the removal of the Indians? Jackson was the architect of the Trail of Tears, which resulted in the deaths of 4, of 16, Cherokees who were kicked off their land in Georgia and sent into exile in Oklahoma.

To ward off alienation and gloom, it is only necessary to remember the unremembered heroes of the past, and to look around us for the unnoticed heroes of the present.

Unsung Heroes

Why not recall the humanitarianism of William Penn, an early colonist who made peace with the Delaware Indians instead of warring on them, as other colonial leaders were doing?

But must we call someone a hero who participated in the invasion of a far-off country and dropped bombs on men, women, and children?

The man was not persuaded. And so many more. The same misguided values that have made slaveholders, Indian-killers, and militarists the heroes of our history books still operate today.

Take another Presidential hero, Theodore Roosevelt, who is always near the top of the tiresome lists of Our Greatest Presidents. Why not Captain Daniel Shays, veteran of the Revolutionary War, who led a revolt of poor farmers in Western Massachusetts against the oppressive taxes levied by the rich who controlled the Massachusetts legislature?

Why Zinn hero essay John Woolman, who, in the years before the Revolution, refused to pay taxes to support the British wars, and who spoke out against slavery? I came across only one voice in the mainstream press daring to dissent from the general admiration for McCain-that of the poet, novelist, and Boston Globe columnist James Carroll.

Roosevelt, remember, had congratulated an American general who in ordered the massacre of men, women, and children on a Philippine island. There he is on Mount Rushmore, as a permanent reminder of our historical amnesia about his racism, his militarism, his love of war.

In the yearthe quincentennial of the arrival of Columbus in this hemisphere, there were meetings all over the country to celebrate him, but also, for the first time, to challenge the customary exaltation of the Great Discoverer.

And enough worship of John F. Kennedy, a Cold Warrior who began the covert war in Indochina, went along with the planned invasion of Cuba, and was slow to act against racial segregation in the South.

I think of the West Coast Longshoremen who participated in an eight-hour work stoppage to protest the death sentence levied against Mumia Abu-Jamal. I think, too, of the thousands of people who have traveled to Fort Benning, Georgia, to demand the closing of the murderous School of the Americas.

Afterward, the other man on the platform, who was chairman of the New Jersey Columbus Day celebration, said to me: Should we not replace the portraits of our Presidents, which too often take up all the space on our classroom walls, with the likenesses of grassroots heroes like Fannie Lou Hamer, the Mississippi sharecropper?

Howard Zinn is a columnist for The Progressive.Howard Zinn's Essay on The Pequot War - When reading Howard Zinn’s essay on the Pequot war, one might not immediately notice the extreme bias in the writing unless he or she has prior knowledge of the Pequot war.

While considered a hero by most in the United States, Zinn argues that people should think twice about Columbus’ actions, and.

Zinn states that in many traditional history books Columbus is portrayed as a hero or almost holy, heroic figure that risked his life to travel to an unknown land and start the New World, but in all actuality his discovery was a completely accident.

Q: 4. Related Documents: Discrimination: Christopher Columbus and Howard Zinn Essay Essay about Christopher Columbus Many people think Columbus is a hero; but in reality he is a villain.

Christopher Columbus is a villain because he brought diseases to Hispaniola, and took Taino as slaves. To begin, Christopher Columbus is a villain because he. Free Essay: Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn Posted on October 13, by dandelionsalad by Howard Zinn Featured Writer Dandelion.

Howard Zinn Chapter One Essay; Howard Zinn Chapter One Essay. Words Oct 7th, 3 Pages. While considered a hero by most in the United States, Zinn argues that people should think twice about Columbus’ actions, and question whether his behavior to the Indians was necessary.

In quotes one and five, Zinn clearly depicts his thoughts. While considered a hero by most in the United States, Zinn argues that people should think twice about Columbus’ actions, and question whether his behavior to the Indians was necessary. In quotes one and five, Zinn clearly depicts his thoughts on the atrocities done by Columbus and other colonists to the natives living in America.

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Zinn hero essay
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